PharmD Info & Catalogue

About the UCI PharmD Program

The program of study emphasizes preventive and integrative health care using innovative and evidence-based instructional methods. The longitudinal, four-year curriculum includes didactic and experiential content areas that span across four categories of sciences: biomedical sciences, pharmaceutical sciences, social/administrative/behavioral sciences, and clinical sciences. Students complete internships and practicum training throughout the program. Didactic courses are generally scheduled during the fall, winter, and spring quarters of the first three years with experiential courses during the summer sessions.  The fourth year consists of six experiential courses plus a cumulative  capstone course. The work of all student pharmacists will be reported with the following grades: honors (H), pass (P), fail (F), satisfactory (S), unsatisfactory (U), incomplete (I), in progress (IP), and withdraw (W).

Beyond the required didactic coursework, pharmacy students participate in a co-curriculum which includes activities such as community service, societies/clubs, and/or student chapters of professional organizations. These activities facilitate students’ personal and professional growth in the areas of leadership, innovation and entrepreneurship, self-awareness, and professionalism.

Additionally, students are required to complete self-directed learning throughout the program, i.e., students follow their interests, or as part of a guided course experience, to develop independent learning opportunities. Examples include group activities such as a journal club, or faculty-guided activities such as a research project.

Normative time to complete the requirements of the Pharm.D. degree is four years. Students enter and work through the program as a cohort. Those on approved leave of absence are expected to return at the same level and must continue making normal progress upon their return. Maximum time to degree is six years.

Our educational philosophy is to prepare successful next-generation pharmacists by making the study of pharmacy a meaningfully enriched intellectual and experiential adventure, where our students will graduate with the knowledge and skills necessary for whatever post-graduate opportunity they seek.

Our program learning outcomes are:

Foundational Knowledge

1.1. Learner (Learner) – Develop, integrate, and apply knowledge from the foundational sciences (i.e., pharmaceutical, social/behavioral/administrative, and clinical sciences) to evaluate the scientific literature, explain drug action, solve therapeutic problems, and contribute knowledge to advance population health and patient-centered care.       

Essentials for Practice and Care

2.1. Patient-centered care (Caregiver) – Provide patient-centered care as the medication expert (collect and interpret evidence, prioritize, formulate assessments and recommendations, implement, monitor and adjust plans, and document activities).

2.2.  Medication use systems management (Manager) – Manage patient healthcare needs using human, financial, technological, and physical resources to optimize the safety and efficacy of medication use systems.

2.3. Health and wellness (Promoter) – Design prevention, intervention, and educational strategies for individuals and communities to manage chronic disease and improve health and wellness.

2.4. Population-based care (Provider) – Describe how population-based care influences patient-centered care and influences the development of practice guidelines and evidence-based best practices.

Approach to Practice and Care

3.1. Problem Solving (Problem Solver) – Identify problems; explore and prioritize potential strategies; and design, implement, and evaluate a viable solution.

3.2. Educator (Educator) – Educate all audiences by determining the most effective and enduring ways to impart information and assess understanding.

3.3. Patient Advocacy (Advocate) – Assure that patients’ best interests are represented.

3.4. Interprofessional collaboration (Collaborator) – Actively participate and engage as a healthcare team member by demonstrating mutual respect, understanding, and values to meet patient care needs.

3.5. Cultural sensitivity (Includer) – Recognize social determinants of health to diminish disparities and inequities in access to quality care.

3.6. Communication (Communicator) – Effectively communicate verbally and nonverbally when interacting with an individual, group, or organization.

Personal and Professional Development

4.1. Self-awareness (Self-aware) – Examine and reflect on personal knowledge, skills, abilities, beliefs, biases, motivation, and emotions that could enhance or limit personal and professional growth.

4.2. Leadership (Leader) – Demonstrate responsibility for creating and achieving shared goals, regardless of position.

4.3. Innovation and Entrepreneurship (Innovator) – Engage in innovative activities by using creative thinking to envision better ways of accomplishing professional goals.

4.4. Professionalism (Professional) – Exhibit behaviors and values that are consistent with the trust given to the profession by patients, other healthcare providers, and society.

Defined technical standards are required for accreditation of US schools of pharmacy by the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education. The following abilities and characteristics are defined as technical standards and are required for admission, promotion, and graduation. Any student intending to practice only a narrow part of clinical pharmacy or pursuing a non-clinical career is not exempt from the technical requirements.

  1. Observation: Candidates must be able to observe demonstrations and experiments in the basic and pharmaceutical sciences. Candidates must be able to accurately observe a patient’s condition, obtain a history, perform appropriate assessments, and to correctly integrate the information derived from these observations to develop and implement an accurate and therapeutically appropriate plan. They must be able to prepare medications for dispensing to patients and observe the activities of technical staff operating under their supervision in accordance with State law. These skills require the functional use of vision, verbal, hearing and somatic sensations.
  2. Communication: Candidates must be able to communicate with, understand, and observe patients in a clinical setting. They must be able to record information accurately and clearly, communicate fluently in and understand the English language, and communicate effectively and sensitively with patients. Candidates must also be able to communicate effectively with other members of the healthcare team in oral and written form, and in patient care settings in which decisions based upon those communications may be made rapidly. They must be able to effectively communicate with and supervise technical support staff.
  3. Motor function: Candidates must possess the motor function sufficient to direct and supervise the accurate compounding and preparation of medications for dispensing to patients. In addition, they must have the motor skills to teach medication administration, including the monitoring and counseling of patients regarding their medication. They must be able to use computer-based information systems. They must adhere to universal precaution measures and meet safety standards applicable to inpatient and outpatient settings and other clinical activities.
  4. Interpretative, conceptual and quantitative abilities: Candidates must have effective and efficient learning techniques and habits that allow mastery of the pharmacy curriculum. They must be able to learn through a variety of modalities including, but not limited to, classroom instruction, small group activities, individual study, preparation and presentation of reports, and use of computer technology. They must be able to memorize, measure, calculate, reason, analyze, synthesize and apply information and concepts. They must also be able to comprehend spatial relationships and three-dimensional models.
  5. Behavioral and social attributes: Candidates must demonstrate the maturity and emotional stability required for full use of their intellectual abilities. They must accept responsibility for learning, exercising sound judgment, and promptly completing all responsibilities attendant to the care of patients. Candidates must understand the legal and ethical aspects of the practice of pharmacy and function within the guidelines established by the law and by the ethical standards of the pharmacy profession. They must be able to relate to patients and their families, colleagues, and other members of the healthcare team with courtesy, maturity, and respect for the dignity of individuals. This requires that they place the welfare of their patients foremost while demonstrating honesty, integrity, dedication, compassion, and nondiscrimination in the care of their patients. They must demonstrate the emotional stability to be able to exercise sound judgment and carry out prompt completion of the responsibilities needed to care for their patients in a sensitive and effective manner. This sensitivity includes self- examination of personal attitudes, perceptions, and stereotypes in order to avoid potential negative impacts on relationships and patient care. Candidates must be able to adapt to changing environments, display flexibility and professional responsibility to their patients, and to learn to function in an environment of uncertainty, in which changes may occur rapidly and without warning. All of these personal qualities will be assessed during the admissions and educational process. Candidates must be able to contribute to collaborative, constructive learning environments, accept constructive feedback from others, and take personal responsibility for making appropriate positive changes.

Student pharmacists are expected to demonstrate certain professional standards throughout their education, both within and outside course instruction, a professional learning experience, and clinical activity. No student shall conduct themself in an unprofessional manner through misrepresentation, harassment, or unlawful discrimination. The preceding list is meant to be examples and not exhaustive. The student pharmacist’s professional behavior will be evaluated by staff, faculty, and preceptors throughout the curriculum and demonstration of professionalism is necessary to progress to graduation. Criminal background checks will be conducted as part of the admissions process. Additional criminal background checks and/or drug screening tests may be conducted in certain clinical settings/locations.

SPPS student pharmacists must agree to uphold the professional standards below: 

  1. Conduct in Patient Care Settings
  • I will behave in a professional, mature, responsible, and ethical manner when interacting with patients, their family members, and caregivers.
  • I will strive to promote the patient’s well-being.
  • I will commit to making time to provide patients with the appropriate drug information counseling and advice.
  • I will show empathy to the needs, values, and perspectives of patients, their family members, and caregivers.
  • I will treat patients in a dignified, supportive, and culturally competent manner.
  • I will respond to my patient’s needs in a timely, safe, and effective manner.
  • I will not falsify physical examination findings, laboratory data, or patient history.
  • I will not endanger the lives of others by conducting clinical responsibilities while impaired by drugs or alcohol.
  • I will not breach patient confidentiality that is guaranteed by state and federal law by any means, including, but not limited to, oral, written, technology exchanges, or inappropriate commenting on social media or other means of technology.
  • I will not discriminate or harass a patient or their family member.

 

  1. Respect
  • I will treat all students, faculty, staff, patients, and the public with respect and dignity.
  • I will respect the rights, privacy, and confidentiality of others.
  • I will treat all people without prejudice or discrimination.
  • I will contribute to an environment that is conducive to learning.
  • I will use professional language at all times when communicating as a student pharmacist.
  • I will maintain a professional attitude and demeanor at all times when communicating as a student pharmacist.
  • I will display active listening and show regard in the presence of classmates, staff, faculty, other healthcare professionals, and the public.
  • I will strive to resolve conflict in a respectful manner.

 

  1. Honesty and Integrity
  • I will act with honesty and integrity at all times.
  • I will honor my commitments to others.
  • I will be honest and trustworthy in my academic and professional responsibilities.
  • I will respect the physical and intellectual property of others.
  • I will neither give nor receive aid/materials in course examinations, requirements, or assignments unless such cooperation is explicitly permitted by the instructor.
  • I will perform all assignments in an objective manner and will give credit to others who were actively involved in the development of ideas and outcomes.
  • I will make decisions that are in the best interest of my patients.
  • I will adhere to standards of the Office of Academic Integrity and Student Conduct.

 

  1. Service
  • I will promote the safe, efficacious, and cost-effective use of medications.
  • I will serve as a mentor for other health professional students when called upon.
  • I will collaborate with other health care providers, the public, and patients to improve quality of care.
  • I will serve as an advocate for patients and the profession.

 

  1. Responsibility
  • I will conduct myself professionally through my actions, attitude, appearance, and dress.
  • I will formulate constructive feedback for others and communicate professionally.
  • I will act responsibly and assume accountability for my actions.
  • I will protect and uphold patient confidentiality and information shared in confidence during committee meeting discussions.
  • I will adhere to applicable UCI policies, procedures, and guidelines.

 

  1. Responsiveness and Adaptability
  • I will act to improve health care and health care education.
  • I will take every opportunity to develop and maintain my interest in, and enthusiasm for, the profession.
  • I will recognize my own limitations and seek appropriate assistance in resolving issues that exceed my knowledge and experience.
  • I will display a positive attitude when receiving constructive feedback.
  • I will commit to continual life-long learning, self-assessment, and actively participate in educational opportunities to expand my professional competence.

PharmD Catalogue

The first course in a four-part series that covers interprofessional communication, patient interviewing, physical examination, and health promotion. Direct instruction in professionalism, diversity, social determinants of health, kindness, mindfulness, well-being, epidemiology, and biostatistics.

The second course in four-part series that covers interprofessional communication, patient interviewing, physical examination, and health promotion. Direct instruction in professionalism, diversity, social determinants of health, kindness, mindfulness, well-being, epidemiology, and biostatistics.

The third course in a four-part series that covers interprofessional communication, patient interviewing, physical examination, and health promotion. Direct instruction in professionalism, diversity, social determinants of health, kindness, mindfulness, well-being, epidemiology, and biostatistics

The fourth course in a four-part series that covers interprofessional communication, patient interviewing, physical examination, and health promotion. Direct instruction in professionalism, diversity, social determinants of health, kindness, mindfulness, well-being, epidemiology, and biostatistics.

The first of a four-part series that covers the function and role of the health care team, Pharmacist Patient Care Process, immunization certification, communication and documentation, informatics, patient safety, interviewing, active listening, management/leadership, careers, resiliency, and student wellness.

The second of a four-part series that covers the function and roles of the health care team, Pharmacist Patient Care Process, immunization certification, communication and documentation, informatics, patient safety, interviewing, active listening, management/leadership, careers, resiliency, and student wellness.

The third of a four-part series that covers the function and role of the health care team, Pharmacist Patient Care Process, immunization certification, communication and documentation, informatics, patient safety, interviewing, active listening, management/leadership, careers, resiliency, and student wellness.

The fourth of a four-part series that covers the function and role of the health care team, Pharmacist Patient Care Process, immunization certification, communication and documentation, informatics, patient safety, interviewing, active listening, management/leadership, careers, resiliency, and student wellness.

The first of a three-part series that focuses on aspects of self care. This course provides pharmacy student with methods and techniques for dealing with the stressors of a professional educational environment and life challenges

The second of a three-part series that focuses on aspects of self care. The study of nonprescription products and complementary and alternative medicine as it relates to the patient’s ability to care for themselves with emphasis on the pharmacist’s consultant role in production selection and non-pharmacological recommendations.

The second of a three-part series that focuses on aspects of self care. The study of nonprescription products and complementary and alternative medicine as it relates to the patient’s ability to care for themselves with emphasis on the pharmacist’s consultant role in production selection and non-pharmacological recommendations.

This course integrates principles of biomedical and pharmaceutical sciences with evidence-based traditional and non-traditional therapies for management and prevention of disease. Topics include clinical chemistry, clinical toxicology, interprofessional health care, and public health. This course covers the central nervous system.

This course integrates principles of biomedical and pharmaceutical sciences with evidence-based traditional and non-traditional therapies for management and prevention of disease. Topics include clinical chemistry, clinical toxicology, interprofessional health care, and public health. This course covers the immune system.

This course integrates principles of biomedical and pharmaceutical sciences with evidence-based traditional and non-traditional therapies for management and prevention of disease. Topics include clinical chemistry, clinical toxicology, interprofessional health care, and public health. This course covers the cardiovascular and respiratory systems.

This course integrates principles of biomedical and pharmaceutical sciences with evidence-based traditional and non-traditional therapies for management and prevention of disease. Topics include clinical chemistry, clinical toxicology, interprofessional health care, and public health. This course covers the endocrine system

This course integrates principles of biomedical and pharmaceutical sciences with evidence-based traditional and non-traditional therapies for management and prevention of disease. Topics include clinical chemistry, clinical toxicology, interprofessional health care, and public health. This course covers gastrointestinal, dermatologic, and opthalmologic disorders.

This course integrates principles of biomedical and pharmaceutical sciences with evidence-based traditional and non-traditional therapies for management and prevention of disease. Topics include clinical chemistry, clinical toxicology, interprofessional health care, and public health. This course covers infectious diseases.

This course integrates principles of biomedical and pharmaceutical sciences with evidence-based traditional and non-traditional therapies for management and prevention of disease. Topics include clinical chemistry, clinical toxicology, interprofessional health care, and public health. This course covers hematology and oncologic disorders.

This course integrates principles of biomedical and pharmaceutical sciences with evidence-based traditional and non-traditional therapies for management and prevention of disease. Topics include clinical chemistry, clinical toxicology, interprofessional health care, and public health. This course covers special population and nutritional disorders.

The first of a three-part series that covers information analysis and research design. This course introduces the concepts and methods of biostatistics and study design and develop the ability to critically evaluate the pharmacy and medical literature. It covers scientific research, the scientific process, and its role in clinical practice.

The second of a three-part series that covers information analysis and research design. This course addresses development of knowledge, skills, and attitudes required for biomedical inquiry and discovery, including methods for data retrieval, analysis, interpretation, and synthesis.

The third of a three-part series that covers information analysis and research design. This course covers distribution of disease and health in groups of people and the factors that influence the distribution, including evaluation of therapeutic and diagnostic treatments and delivery of health care services.

The first of a three-part series covering principles of microbiology and clinical chemistry. This course introduces classification, morphology, and physiology of micro-organisms, particularly those that cause human pathology – bacteria, viruses, fungi, protozoans, parasite, and worms – and the body’s immune response.

The second of a three-part series covering principles of microbiology and clinical chemistry. This course continues classification, morphology, and physiology of micro-organisms, particularly those that cause human pathology – bacteria, viruses, fungi, protozoans, parasite, and worms – and the body’s immune response.

The third of a three-part series covering principles of microbiology and clinical chemistry. Emphasis on normal human physiology and pathology as it related to clinical chemistry and assessment of disease states with the context of the Pharmacist Patient Care Process. Alterations of clinical chemistry results due to drug therapy is covered.

The course provides an overview of the basic principles of pharmacology, covering pharmacodynamics – effects of drugs on the body- and pharmacokinetics – the process by which a drug is absorbed, distributed, metabolized, and excreted by the body.

This course covers the framework, principles, and core responsibilities of public health research and practice from multidisciplinary perspectives. It also provides the necessary foundation for further studies using crosscutting approaches essential for public health practice. (concurrent with PUBHLTH 200)

This course walks students through the basics of genetics and genomics. Particular emphasis is placed on the use of genetics or genetic testing to assist in patient treatment regimens and evaluation of disease.

Topics include the biological, chemical and cellular roles of carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, nucleic acids, hormones, enzymes and vitamins. In addition, the chemical and cellular basis of digestion, intermediary metabolism, biological oxidation and metabolic antagonism are discussed

This course examines California/Federal legal requirements associated with pharmacy practice and operations. Case-studies allow students to make decisions upon legal/ethical reasoning. Students will use the self-assessment form for California pharmacies and become familiar with materials on the California Pharmacy Jurisprudence examination.

This course introduces students to the organization, financing, and delivery of health care serves in the U.S. The relationship of providers, patients, payers, etc. are analyzed. Management and research principles utilized to manage drug therapy are introduced.

Fundamentals of pharmacology and mechanisms of action are reinforced and applied to learn the clinical effects of acute/chronic exposure derived from environmental, dietary, occupational and pharmaceutical sources. Students focus on information literacy skills and clinical management of poisonings.

An introduction to human anatomy and coverage of fundamental aspects of human physiology. The course uses a visual and systemic approach to the study of the body. The functional aspects of anatomy are integrated with structure. Includes laboratory periods.

This course is the first in a foundational series designed to develop an understanding of the science behind drug formulation, mechanisms, pharmacokinetics and interconnections with the Pharmacist Patient Care Process. In laboratory, students perform calculations, compounding, dispensing, and labeling.

The second course in a foundational series designed to develop an understanding of the science behind drug formulation, mechanisms, pharmacokinetics and interconnections with the Pharmacist Patient Care Process. Topics include drug substances, dosage forms, and therapeutic effects. Includes laboratory.

The final course in a foundational series designed to develop an understanding of the science behind drug formulation, mechanisms, pharmacokinetics, and interconnections with the Pharmacist Patient Care Process. In laboratory, students perform pharmacokinetic modeling, drug screening, and comprehensive therapeutic efficacy.

This course walks students through the basics of medicinal chemistry, broadly defined. Students utilize the knowledge gained in organic chemistry, biochemistry, molecular biology, physical chemistry, pharmacology and physiology in an integrated fashion. Includes laboratory utilizing organic chemistry.

This course walks students through medicinal chemistry, broadly defined. Students utilize the knowledge gained in organic chemistry, biochemistry, molecular biology, physical chemistry, pharmacology and physiology in an integrated fashion as applied to modern medicinal chemistry.

This course provides students an opportunity to develop independent thinking, with particular focus on maturing analytical skills. Students are encouraged to develop an independent project, with a mentor, to study pharmacy-related aspects of multiple areas. The first phase identifies project focus.

This course provides students an opportunity to develop independent thinking, with particular focus on maturing analytical skills. Students develop an independent project, with a mentor, to study pharmacy-related aspects of multiple areas. Phase 2 focuses on final evaluation of the project.

This is course reinforces and assesses student pharmacist’s performance on cumulative learning outcomes; pre-APPE and APPE knowledge, skills, and attitudes; entrustable professional activities; team- and practice-readiness; and to demonstrate that student pharmacists are achieving outcomes required by the ACPE.

This course is designed to engage students and expose them to seminar speakers that come to discuss research or case studies in pharmaceutical sciences and pharmacy.

The Introductory Pharmacy Practice Experiences (IPPE) are a series of experiential learning courses providing an introduction to contemporary models of pharmacy practice and designed to provide the foundation for the student pharmacists in preparation for their APPEs. This course focuses on community pharmacy practice.

The Introductory Pharmacy Practice Experiences (IPPE) are a series of experiential learning courses providing an introduction to contemporary models of pharmacy practice and designed to provide the foundation for the student pharmacists in preparation for their APPEs. This course focuses on institutional or health system pharmacy practice.

The Introductory Pharmacy Practice Experiences (IPPE) are a series of experiential learning courses providing an introduction to contemporary models of pharmacy practice and designed to provide the foundation for the student pharmacists in preparation for their APPEs. This course focuses on integrative health.

The Introductory Pharmacy Practice Experiences (IPPE) are a series of experiential learning courses providing an introduction to contemporary models of pharmacy practice and provide the foundation for the student pharmacists in preparation for their APPEs. This course will build on previous IPPEs.

The Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experiences (APPE) are a series of clerkships providing advance experiential learning in contemporary models of pharmacy practice and designed to facilitate application of Pre-APPE knowledge, skills, and attitudes towards patient-care and non-patient activities. Ambulatory Care focus.

The Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experiences (APPE) are a series of clerkships providing advance experiential learning in contemporary models of pharmacy practice and designed to facilitate application of Pre-APPE knowledge, skills, and attitudes towards patient-care and non-patient activities. Community focus.

The Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experiences (APPE) are a series of clerkships providing advance experiential learning in contemporary models of pharmacy practice and designed to facilitate application of Pre-APPE knowledge, skills, and attitudes towards patient-care and non-patient activities. Hospital Pharmacy focus.

The Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experiences (APPE) are a series of clerkships providing advance experiential learning in contemporary models of pharmacy practice and designed to facilitate application of Pre-APPE knowledge, skills, and attitudes towards patient-care and non-patient activities. Medicine area focus.

The Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experiences (APPE) are a series of clerkships providing advance experiential learning in contemporary models of pharmacy practice and designed to facilitate application of Pre-APPE knowledge, skills, and attitudes towards patient-care and non-patient activities. Two Electives required.

The Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experiences (APPE) are a series of clerkships providing advance experiential learning in contemporary models of pharmacy practice and designed to facilitate application of Pre-APPE knowledge, skills, and attitudes towards patient-care and non-patient activities. Two Electives required.